The Foolish Logic of the Liberal – Mark Cuban Style

Mark Cuban pretends he is Prejudiced

 

Mark Cuban wants to pretend that he is prejudiced in order to accuse himself of prejudice like he is a broad-minded, self-accusing soul.

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He wants to seem that he is a nice guy who openly admits to bigotry.

He says, “If I see a black kid in a hoodie at night on the same side of the street, I’m probably going to walk to the other side of the street.”

And he calls that prejudice. He’s almost ashamed of himself.  Percentage-wise blacks commit fifty per cent of the murders even though they are thirteen per cent of the population.  No guarantee that the kid in the hoodie is a killer but the chances that he is are certainly far greater.

Cuban is not prejudiced.  He is smart.  He didn’t become a billionaire by partnering up with bankrupt partners.

Cuban thinks that we will love him for admitting his prejudice and his sincere admission that he is bigoted.

I can’t love a fool.  It is foolish to say that you are prejudiced for not recognizing danger when it is apparent. He knows that fear of young males in hoodies is not bigotry but a pragmatic appraisal of the reality that surrounds him.

He should not apologize.  He should remind the blacks that they have a lot of housekeeping to do in their own hoods so that they clean up their act.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

David Lawrence

David Lawrence

David Lawrence has a Ph.D. in literature. He has published over 200 blogs, 600 poems, a memoir “The King of White-Collar Boxing,” several books of poems, including “Lane Changes.” Both can be purchased on Amazon.com. He was a professional boxer and a CEO. Last year he was listed in New York Magazine as the 41st reason to love New York.

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