Navajo Indians Slam Green Billionaire Tom Steyer’s ‘Slap in the Face’ Energy Plan

Green zealot Tom Steyer has been spending his millions pushing greenism for at least a decade, now, but a spokesman for the Navajo Nation is not having any of it calling Steyer’s green ideas a “slap in the face” to native Americans.

Steyer has been spending millions of his own cash and helping to raise even more to push Arizona Proposition 127, a jobs-killing energy proposal that would hurt thousands of Arizona families.

Many of the families that would be hardest hit by Steyers’ Prop 127 are American Indians in the area who make their livings in the current energy sector. And they are not sitting quietly bye as Steyer works to destroy their livelihood.

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According to Daily Caller:

Navajo Nation leaders are not supportive of Tom Steyer’s campaign to force Arizona into dramatically increasing its renewable energy mandate, a mandate they argue would financially ruin their community.

Beyond the 300 elected officials and more than 100 community groups that have come out in opposition to the renewable energy initiative, one other major Arizona constituency has a strong opinion: the Navajo Nation.

Nestled in the northeastern corner of Arizona and reaching into New Mexico and Utah as well, the Navajo Nation earns the title as the largest Native American reservation in the U.S. Its population of more than 350,000 work in an array of different jobs, with a substantial amount of their income related to the energy sector. The majority of employees currently working in the Navajo Generating Station, Kayenta Mine and the Four Corners Generating Station, for example, are made up of Navajo Nation members.

Should Prop 127 pass, many of the power generation jobs these Native Americans work in would be put at risk — dealing a heavy blow to a community that is already beleaguered with poverty and high unemployment. Because of this, Navajo Nation leaders have come out in strong opposition to Steyer’s renewable energy campaign.

“Our frustration, from the Navajo Nation’s perspective, is the devastation that this would mean, socially and economically, for those in Arizona and to the Navajo Nation specifically,” Navajo spokesperson Carlyle Begay said. “Our Navajo Nation economy is largely based on our natural resources that bless our lands. These resources provide essential government functions for our people and represents thousands of high-paying Navajo Nation jobs,” Begay added.

Navajos have also created a video ad to oppose Steyer’s green extremism:

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Twitter @warnerthuston.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Warner Todd Huston

Warner Todd Huston

Warner Todd Huston has been writing editorials and news since 2001 but started his writing career penning articles about U.S. history back in the early 1990s. Huston has appeared on Fox News, Fox Business Network, CNN, and several local Chicago News programs to discuss the issues of the day. Additionally, he is a regular guest on radio programs from coast to coast. Huston has also been a Breitbart News contributor since 2009. Warner works out of the Chicago area, a place he calls a "target rich environment" for political news.

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