Criticizing Rap Lyrics Is Now Racist

Whether or not the rap lyrics should have mattered, the New York Times didn’t want readers to see them in their pages.

So after trying to sink Donald Trump for a secret audio recording the New York Times is now hiding the rap lyrics of a Democratic candidate in New York City.

Bre Payton writes at The Federalist, “Is The New York Times Hiding A Democratic Candidate’s Obscene Rap Lyrics?

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Rep. Jon Faso, a Republican seeking re-election in a hotly contested New York district, called out his opponent for referring to women as “cheap -ss hoes” (obscenity altered) in a rap lyric. Under the stage name “AD the Voice,” Antonio Delgado, who is running as a Democrat against Faso, also had some negative things to say about the police. In another lyric, Delgado reportedly sings: “When I spit, they (cops) sh-t” (obscenity altered).

In an editorial published last week, The New York Times slammed Faso for “race baiting” his opponent because the congressman criticized his opponent’s rap lyrics — yes, seriously. The New York Times now considers it race-baiting to criticize someone for rapping about “cheap -ss hoes.”

When the Times does quote Delgado’s lyrics and write about his history as a rapper, the editorial board mentions a patriotic lyric, with no mention of his offensive lyrics.

“He could start with one of his campaign opponent’s songs, ‘Draped in Flags’ in which Mr. Delgado said Americans who love their country have a duty to question their government,” the editorial reads. […]

In response, Fasso wrote a letter to the Times objecting to the tone of the article and quoting some of his opponent’s negative lyrics. But the Faso campaign says the Times, in an effort to shield Delgado, cut out the part of the congressman’s statement that quoted the lyrics.

Read the full post.

But the New York Times didn’t just censor Fasso from responding on their openly partisan pages, they devoted page space to coming up with pseudo-intellectual verbiage to say it was racist to mention the rap lyrics:

The criticism of Mr. Delgado has thrust historically fraught topics of race and identity into the forefront of an election that was already slated to be one of the most competitive in this November’s midterm elections. Mr. Delgado, who is black, said he believed the attack on his lyrics is an attempt to “otherize” him, particularly because he’s trying to become the first nonwhite candidate to represent the area in Congress.

That’s right. This is the same “news”-paper that considered Dante de Blasio’s ethnic hair style a substantial means of voter outreach that made Bill de Blasio mayor of New York City.

To an unusual degree, he relied on his own biracial family to connect with an increasingly diverse electorate, electrifying voters with a television commercial featuring his charismatic 15-year-old son, Dante, who has a towering Afro.

Did these people have any problem “otherizing” Donald Trump, using his appearance, race, or anything else they could grab?

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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