NY Times: Still No Democratic Champion

There are five obvious challengers, but not one is a Democratic champion and all are globalists.

This New York Times story is right that there is no Democratic champion available to go up against Trump in 2020. But it is wrong to say that the five apparent candidates—Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden, Corey Booker, Kamala Harris, and Bernie Sanders—represent a diverse group (“traverse the ideological and tonal spectrum between combative Democratic socialism and consensus-minded incrementalism.”) No, every one is a globalist and a pro–war and pro-surveillance ideologue. Every one has defended our interference in Syria and sided with the “intelligence community” against Donald Trump.

None of them seem to be saying anything that could bring back some of Donald Trump’s coalition to vote for the Democrats.

The New York Times reports, “Warren Is Preparing for 2020. So Are Biden, Booker, Harris and Sanders.

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Trending: Hillary Clinton Says Something Absolutely Insane

During a campaign-style tour of the West late last month, Senator Elizabeth Warren did not announce she was running for president. But in private events and public speeches, her message about 2020 was as clear as it was rousing.

[…]

Before the trip and since, Ms. Warren and her emissaries have been reaching out to key Democratic officeholders in Iowa, Nevada and South Carolina — three states early in the presidential primary calendar — making introductions and offering help in the midterm campaign. Altogether, her moves are among the most assertive steps taken by any Democrat to prepare for 2020.

Ms. Warren, 69, now leads a small advance guard of Democrats who appear to be moving deliberately toward challenging President Trump. Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., wielding a political network cultivated over decades, has been reasserting himself as a party leader, while Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California have emerged as fresher-faced messengers for the midterms. And Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the runner-up in the 2016 primaries, has been acting like a candidate as he considers another race.

All five have been traveling the country, raising money for Democrats and gauging the appeal of their personalities and favorite themes. As a group, they are a strikingly heterogeneous array of rivals for Mr. Trump, embodying the Democratic Party’s options for defining itself: They are distinguished by gender and race, span three decades in age and traverse the ideological and tonal spectrum between combative Democratic socialism and consensus-minded incrementalism.

Yet absent, at least so far, is either an obvious political phenom like former President Barack Obama or an establishment-backed juggernaut in the mold of Hillary Clinton. Unlike the last few Democratic primaries, the unsettled race evokes the sprawling nomination fights of earlier decades — lacking a dominant figure and seemingly inviting new leaders to rise.

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The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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