Media Reports E.U. Afraid of Donald Trump

Joe Scudder
Written by Joe Scudder

With the E.U. afraid of the President hurting their image, he’s in a good position to negotiate with Vladimir Putin.

While the mainstream media contrasts an E.U. afraid of Donald Trump while he looks forward to meeting with Vladimir Putin as a way of questioning his loyalties, the fact is that Trump is claiming the high ground. A President who refuses to be the tool of Europe will be more respected and trusted by the Kremlin, giving him more leverage to negotiate. Remember that the same thing happened in Canada with the G7 right before the North Korea summit.

The fact is, what happens with North Korea is far more important than the G7 and our relationship with Russia is far more consequential for American interest than the dying E.U.

The Washington Post reports (as reprinted in the Chicago Tribune), “Trump takes shots at NATO, May but praises Putin as he prepares to meet with alliance leaders.

President Donald Trump signaled he was ready for a transatlantic brawl Tuesday as he embarked on a consequential week of international diplomacy, taking aim at vulnerable British Prime Minister Theresa May and suggesting that meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin might be easier than talking with Western allies at the NATO summit here.

Leaders converged on Brussels fearful of what the combative U.S. president might say or do to rupture the liberal world order, with some European diplomats privately predicting calamity.

As he departed Washington on Tuesday, Trump stoked the deep divisions in May’s government to undermine the leader of America’s closest historic ally on the eve of the NATO meeting. Asked if May should remain in power, Trump said, “That’s up to the people,” while also complimenting her top rival, Boris Johnson.

Some of Europe’s counters to Trump, including May and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, arrive with heavy domestic political baggage of their own, making them vulnerable in negotiations with Trump as they seek to protect the Western alliance from his impulses on defense spending and trade.

Trump has long prized his instincts for taking advantage of an adversary’s weaknesses, and referred to the “turmoil” confronting May at home in remarks to reporters.

The prime minister faces a rebellion from advocates of a hard break from the European Union, who say she has been waffling, and is in danger of losing control. Johnson, a potential successor to May, resigned Monday as foreign secretary and reportedly savaged her Brexit plan as “a big turd.”

Trump praised him in personal terms: “Boris Johnson is a friend of mine. He’s been very, very nice to me and very supportive. And maybe we’ll speak to him when I get over there. I like Boris Johnson. I’ve always liked him.”

Read the full story.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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