The Latest Bipartisan DACA Deal Is Flawed

The bipartisan DACA fix will leave the nation’s borders badly damaged!

There is a bipartisan DACA bill coming to the floor that, despite (or because of) bipartisan support, is deeply problematic. Author and writer Donna Carol Voss blows the whistle on some of the problems with the bill. For one, the “children” qualify even if they were brought into the United States one day before their eighteenth birthday, even if they don’t speak English and don’t know anything about American culture.

The Federalist reports, “4 Things You Need To Know About The Latest Bipartisan DACA ‘Fix’.”

take our poll - story continues below

Who should replace Nikki Haley as our ambassador to the U.N.?

  • Who should replace Nikki Haley as our ambassador to the U.N.?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Eagle Rising updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

One of those bills is the enticingly bipartisan Uniting and Securing America (USA) Act of 2018, which addresses what to do with DACA recipients — the millions of illegal immigrants given temporary legal status under President Obama.

The bill is sponsored by Republicans and supported by a whole lot of Democrats, which sounds like a good thing, but it’s not. Bipartisan only works when the underlying bill is solid, and this one isn’t.

Here are four things you need to know about the bill.

1. Aliens Who Entered the U.S. Illegally One Day Before Their 18th Birthday Are Eligible

The first 18 years of a person’s life are formative – he or she learns language, cultural norms, and values. That’s why upwards of 80 percent of Americans think children brought here illegally by their parents should legally be allowed to stay. We’re all they’ve known.

Well, the USA 2018 Act turns that kind of thinking on its head.

Under this bill, a “child” who is minutes away from her 18th birthday can be brought illegally into this country by her parents and qualify for conditional permanent resident status. Even if she spoke no English and knew nothing of our culture upon entry, she can ride the same path to citizenship as someone who was brought here as an infant and knows nothing else.

Aliens can enter as late as age 17 and are required to have been in the U.S. continuously since only December 31, 2013. The potentially eligible population could be as many as 3.2 million.

2. Convicted Felons Are Not Excluded

At first blush, the requirements for receiving conditional permanent resident status in the bill look solid, especially the part about no convictions for certain serious offenses.

But there’s an exception. Aliens who can prove their violent crime is “related” to a crime someone else perpetrated on them are exempted from the requirement…

Her third point is that the hardship exceptions are too easy and her fourth point is that the majority of Americans don’t want this bill.

Read the entire post.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Send this to a friend