Media Pretends the FBI Coup Story Doesn’t Exist

Joe Scudder
Written by Joe Scudder

While purporting to be a story about impeachment and indictment, the real point of the story is to pretend the Mueller investigation did not originate in an FBI coup.

This story is about how it is impossible for Richard Mueller to indict the President. It’s going to take an act of Congress to impeach President Trump. The headline implies that the Democrats are planning on taking Congress and voting for impeachment. However, that element is muted in the story, perhaps because the New York Times is unsure that is going to happen.

But, otherwise, the story asserts that Republicans are seeking “to exploit the Mueller investigation” by “demonizing” Mueller. They completely ignore the piling evidence that the special prosecutor is a result of the ongoing attempted FBI coup.

The New York Times reports, “Congressional Candidates, Not Mueller, Could Decide Trump’s Future.

While some candidates on the left and right have sought to exploit the Mueller investigation in different ways — Democrats calling for impeachment, Republicans demonizing the special counsel — most politicians in difficult races have sought to avoid the issue. They have largely adopted a posture of deference to Mr. Mueller, insisting that the special counsel must finish his work before they judge the facts.

That day of judgment, however, may be approaching with inconvenient speed. Should Mr. Mueller unearth information implicating the president or members of his immediate family in serious crimes, it could put enormous and in many cases unwanted pressure on Congress to take action — and on congressional candidates to take a stand.

Mr. Trump and his lawyers have denied that he conspired with Russians to influence the 2016 election, or that he did anything to obstruct an investigation into Russian interference.

Already, several dozen Democrats voted earlier this year to advance an impeachment resolution against Mr. Trump, and public opinion polls show the idea of toppling the president is hugely popular with Democratic voters. Holding back an avalanche of impeachment calls could prove difficult for the party in the event of a damning report.

Mr. Trump, meanwhile, has rallied his base by repeatedly denouncing the investigation, and strategists in his camp believe they can mobilize voters on the right by warning that a Democratic-controlled Congress would seek, in effect, to invalidate Mr. Trump’s election. But that political strategy could prove difficult to sustain if Mr. Mueller furnishes extensive evidence of wrongdoing by Mr. Trump or his associates, or indicts other people close to the president.

Martin Frost, a former member of Congress from Texas who led the Democrats’ campaign efforts in 1998, as Republicans sought to impeach Mr. Clinton, warned that moving against a president has the potential to backfire. In Mr. Clinton’s last midterm election, Democrats gained seats when voters rejected Republican demands that they punish the president’s party.

Read the full story.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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