Alabama Supreme Court Ruling Could End Legal Abortion in America

In a case unrelated to abortion, the Alabama Supreme Court rendered a decision that could topple the legal spires of unholy abortions here in the United States.

The case involved Sarah Janie Hicks who used illegal drugs while she was pregnant.  After her baby was born, the infant tested positive for drugs and Hicks was charged with a crime and ended up pleading guilty to violating Alabama’s chemical endangerment statute.

Her conviction was challenged and ended up before the Alabama State Supreme Court on the basis that the term ‘child’ did not include the unborn.

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“I concur with the main opinion and with Justice Parker’s concurring specially opinion, which rightly notes that ‘[b]ecause an unborn child has an inalienable right to life from its earliest stages of development, it is entitled … to a life free from the harmful effects of chemicals at all stages of development.’ ___ So. 3d at ___. I write separately to emphasize that the inalienable right to life is a gift of God that civil government must secure for all persons—born and unborn.”

“I. Our Creator, Not Government, Gives to All People ‘Unalienable’ Natural Rights.”

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