Blame the ‘Cowards of Broward’ for Most Recent School Shooting, Not the NRA

Kyle Kashuv is perhaps the most important voice to rise above the din in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

The young man is one of the few (vocal) pro-liberty students to raise his voice in an effort to make schools across America safer.

Kashuv has argued that much of what the anti-gun left has been suggesting over the last few weeks would actually do little to make school safer. Indeed, while his fellow students have been marching to take away the rights of law abiding citizens, Kashuv has instead been meeting with legislators and getting important new laws passed.

These three bills which were all co-authored by Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) and supported by Kashuv and the families of the Douglas High School victims, have all become law and are meant to seal the gaps exposed by the shooting in Parkland, FL.

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The bills aren’t perfect, and the “Red Flag” bill in particular raises some 2nd Amendment red flags (pun intended), but it’s more evidence that while liberals are out protesting and grandstanding, it’s conservatives, like Kashuv and Rubio, working to actually make a difference.

In a recent interview on CBS’ Face the Nation Kashuv explained that his fellow students may be well-meaning, but they’re wrong. The blame for the shooting in Parkland doesn’t lay at the feet of the NRA, Marco Rubio, or conservative gun owners.

Instead, Kashuv blames the shooter and the government system that allowed the shooter to commit the evil act that he did. “I mean we’ve seen on so many different levels that the cowards of Broward failed, the FBI failed, Sheriff Scott Israel failed. So many different multilayered levels failed in Parkland and it’s absolutely reprehensible that I didn’t see one single poster yesterday at the march that said F the NRA, sorry. That said F Sheriff Scott Israel,” Kashuv said of the “March for our Lives” rally in Washington, D.C. this past weekend.

Margaret Brennan: So have you considered, I mean give me a sense when you go back to- to Parkland and you have to go to school and sit in the same classroom with some of these people you’re disagreeing with. How many other fellow students support your way of thinking?

Kyle Kashuv: There’s a very– there’s a silent minority at Stoneman Douglas who agrees with me completely. Something called the Marshal Program which was registered and implemented in Florida and which would allow properly trained officers and- and veterans and unemployed veterans to acquire the training to protect our schools because we’ve seen in Maryland that the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. And it really concerned me as to how come we did not see a single person-

Margaret Brennan: You would have liked more armed guards at the school?

Kyle Kashuv: Absolutely, I mean we saw it Maryland. He- he stopped the shooter. He did his job and had the cowards of Broward done their job, I think that the count in Parkland would have been much lower. We saw that in Maryland that a good guy with a gun stopped the bad guy with the gun. The only way to stop an active shooter on campus is to have another person to- to eliminate him…

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