Sad! Tree Planted by George Washington Destroyed by Storm

Wow! We lost a natural, historical monument that many people did not even realize existed.

About 227 years ago, forefather George Washington planted a Canadian Hemlock at Mount Vernon. Vernon is where Washington’s plantation was located, right by the Potomac River.

A powerful storm whipped through and unfortunately destroyed the ancient life form.

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“Today at Mount Vernon, strong winds brought down a 227-year-old Canadian Hemlock, as well as a Virginia Cedar that stood watch over Washington’s tomb for many years,” they posted on Facebook. 

Fox 5 News reports: 

The tree was planted by Washington in 1791, according to the estate’s director of horticulture. It was the site’s “best-documented tree on the property arriving in a half whiskey barrel” from New York’s then-governor, George Clinton.

Mount Vernon’s senior vice president of visitor engagement, Rob Shenk, tweeted that while “The DC area lost a lot of #trees yesterday” there were “maybe none more significant than this 1791 Canadian Hemlock.” Shenk said “George Washington himself likely knew” of the tree.

Powerful winds ripped through the region on Friday as wind gusts up to 70 mph toppled trees, street lights and power lines, knocking out power to thousands in the DC area and causing multiple deaths in the Northeast.

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Keely Sharp

Keely Sharp

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