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Finally: Philly and Foles

Written by Jim Bowman

On the morning of the Super Bowl, I had the same premonition as I had on Election Day.  I thought, this is the day we win or lose so let’s get it on.

Of course, there’s no way that a four point underdog could equal Trump’s underdog “narrow path for victory” but still, football’s behemoth winning franchise seemed as formidable as Clinton’s certain win.  But, guess what?

Being  born and bred a “Philly boy,” if the old saying about patience is a virtue, then myself and all Philadelphians must be virtuous as all get out. That being said, those studded championship rings seemed to always detoured around the City of Brotherly Love.

I mean in the eastern division, even Washington has Super Bowl acclaim.  And of course the Cowgirls and those front running New York Giants own the same claim.  And especially those classless Giants, since they beat Brady and company twice.  Well now, the class of the Eastern Division has finally been reshuffled into its proper setting with a Philly championship.

The NFL needed this game.  When possible league MVP and starting QB Carson Wentz was injured and turned the ball over to Nick Foles, the media’s cadre of sporting analysts all echoed the Wall St Journal’s airing of Michael Salfino’s “The Eagles Are Going To Miss Wentz” piece.  Again, guess what?

Given that Wentz returns healthy and able, the “dogs” of Philly have the most enviable of quarterback situations in the NFL.  Two all stars!  And following directly on the heels of Philly’s win, coach Pederson was automatically asked that controversial question; who starts next season?

While discussing quarterback qualities and as a former admirer of Brady, despite his previous win against my last Eagle’s Super Bowl, I would be remised if not commenting on his classless snub of Foles as he retreated from the field after the game.

It’s customary for both QBs to meet and shake hands in a congratulatory fashion after going head to head in the game.  His rudeness was noticed and sadly will be remembered by not only those in attendance but also those who compete at all levels of football.  Winning isn’t what teaches the most important of lessons; losing and how one loses is the measure most admired and hardest to acquire.

Adversity teaches and Brady disserviced himself when walking away from that lesson.  As such, possibly the greatest quarterback to have ever played may hold all the statistical records but will never be considered as the total package since his heart beats only for his own rewards.  Therefore, his actions on the field now appear to being merely robotic.

On the other side of the field, what began as a highly productive career as a Eagle’s starter was too quickly severed by a college coach who dismantled much of the Eagles promising future.  Fole’s lack luster journey was full of adversity and self doubt.  Even to the point of considering his walking away from the game.

After months of soul searching and praying with close family members, his decision to stay in the NFL bore the rare fruit of a championship.  And as Philly’s first Super Bowl victory, for a team and a city that this Texan has adopted and has been adopted by inturn, this feat will be Philly’s finest of lasting sport’s moments.

In testament to this underdog performance but also by validating the lesson which adversity teaches, not only in the sporting world but in all endeavors, let the Super Bowl champion quarterback appropriately add: “The big thing is don’t be afraid to fail.  In our society, with (social media) it’s highest reel, I think when you have a rough day, you’re feeling you can’t – failure is a part of your life, I wouldn’t be up here if I hadn’t failed a million times.  You share that.  I’m human, not superman.  When you struggle in your life, it’s an opportunity to grow.  If there’s something going on in your life, embrace it.”

This attitude of Nick Foles, in addition to being the most valuable player of the Super Bowl, also presents an asset to both the game of football and to life in general.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Jim Bowman

Retired, grandfather, 71 years old, Vietnam vet, author of This Roar of Ours, over 25 year of published op/eds.

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