Senate Forced to Vote on Bill to Undo Net Neutrality Repeal

Keely Sharp
Written by Keely Sharp

Just when we thought the fight over net neutrality was over…it’s not.

A Senate bill created to undo the the net neutrality bill has received enough backing to force a Senate vote. The Federal Communications Commission repealed the internet rule implemented under the Obama administration. However, Democrats are fighting the repeal hard and want it undone.

IJR reports:

Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) first filed the resolution in mid-December. If passed, the bill would overturn the FCC’s rollback of net neutrality rules under the Congressional Review Act (CRA) — the same legislative policy Republicans used to roll back Obama-era regulations last year. It would also prohibit the FCC from ever attempting to repeal the rules in the future.

Democrats face an uphill battle to win the bipartisan support necessary for the bill’s success, however. The CRA requires legislators to gather enough support to force a majority vote in the House and Senate. Currently, no Republican legislator has expressed support for the resolution.

Even so, Markey called the bill a “big step toward restoring a free and open internet” and remains hopeful that net neutrality will be restored.

Markey said, “We’ve reached the magic number of 30 to secure a vote on the Senate floor, and that number will only continue to climb.”

“Republicans are faced with a choice — be on the right side of history,” he continued, “and stand with the American people who support a free and open internet, or hold hands with special interests who want to control the internet for their own profit.”

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


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Keely Sharp

Keely Sharp

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