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Christmas Tax Cut Empowers Companies to Take Care of Employees or Hire More

Joe Scudder
Written by Joe Scudder

Donald Trump is the Santa Clause delivering a Christmas tax cut that enables many companies to get in the Holiday spirit.

It is obvious now that, despite delays, doubts, and disappointed hopes for an earlier victory, the Christmas tax cut ended up being perfect timing for White House PR. The news is filled with corporates news of raises, bonuses, and expansions.

Despite the economic damage inflicted during the Obama years, there are moves toward growth now precisely because people have been waiting a long time for an opportunity to invest. The question of how much companies “care” about their employees is a distraction. Companies depend on their workforce. Therefore, they want to boost morale and prevent turnover when they can. By lightening the burden on corporations, Donald Trump put wealth into the pockets of the middle class.

Merry Christmas!

WND reports, “The Big List of Tax-Cut Payoffs.

Before the ink was even dry on President Trump’s signature on the Republican tax-cut bill, corporate America was not only toasting it, praising it and celebrating it, but handing out money to employees like Santa Claus.

It started with AT&T expanding its bonus program to an additional 200,000 staffers getting $1,000 apiece.

Next came Boeing announcing a gift of $300 million in investment in its employee-related charitable program “to support our heroes, our homes and our future.”

Wells Fargo and Fifth Third Bancorp announced they would raise their minimum wage to $15 in the New Year, with Fifth Third kicking in an additional bonus of $1,000 to 13,000 employees.

Comcast NBC Universal anted up $1,000 bonuses to more than 100,000 non-executive employees, announcing the move was not only tied, like all the others, to the tax cut but to the Federal Communications Commission’s elimination of government regulation of the Internet. Comcast NBC Universal Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Brian L. Roberts added the company plans to spend more than $50 billion in the next five years on infrastructure investments that he expects will create “thousands of new direct and indirect jobs.”

In fact, before the bill was even passed, Kroger Chief Executive Officer W. Rodney McMullen offered that the legislation would influence his company “to continue to invest in our business, which will grow jobs.”

See the whole list of companies.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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