Proud, Black Confederate Woman: ‘I Feel More Welcome in the South’

Karen Cooper grew up in the North and was accustomed to the way they tend to separate the races.

Then she came to the South and she was was awestruck at the hospitality and welcoming nature of the people here, and how we were just all “together.”

She has proudly embraced the southern culture. Although she may be black, but she is proudly waving the Confederate flag and telling others out how it truly does “represent freedom” and history.

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NY Daily News reports:

In an interview for a documentary “Battle Flag,” Virginia resident Karen Cooper described why she joined the Virginia Flaggers, a group that defends the rebel flag against those who “worship ignorance, historical revisionism and political correctness.”

Cooper, who found the flagging group through her activism in the Tea Party, explained the Confederate flag symbolizes a movement away from big government.

“I actually think that it represents freedom,” she said in an interview for “Battle Flag,” a documentary project about the flag. “It represents a people who stood up to tyranny.”

The interview comes amid a national discussion about the flag’s meaning — and vocal calls to remove it from government buildings after a rebel flag-supporter shot and killed nine people in a historical black church.

Cooper, a New York native who later settled in Virginia, brushed off the flag’s history in slavery, explaining that oppression is not exclusive to the Confederate.

She said, “I’m not advocating slavery or think that it was right. It wasn’t and none of my friends think it was. It was just something that happened. It didn’t just happen in the South — it happened worldwide.”

Cooper also aded that she believes “slavery was a choice.” Her explanation traces back to a quote by Patrick Henry: “Give me liberty, or give me death.”

She said, “If we went back to that kind of slavery — no I couldn’t do it. Give me death.” Although both options were gruesome, she has a point.

She also made another extremely valid point. Cooper said she is for small government (as most Conservatives are because big government sucks). She said that we are still living as slaves today to the government, just under different circumstances.

“I feel I’m a slave now because the federal government does control me. I can’t smoke what I want to smoke. I can’t drink what I want to drink. If I want to put something into my body, it’s my body, not theirs,” she continued, “That’s tyranny!”

Cooper added, “I know what people think about when they see the battle flag: the KKK, racism, bringing slavery back. So I knew it would be something for people to see a black woman with the battle flag. How can it be racist if I’m out there with them?”

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


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Keely Sharp

Keely Sharp

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