John Podesta Trashes Trump for Firing Comey…But Look What Podesta Was Saying Right Before it Happened

It seems lots of people have all of a sudden changed their opinion of FBI Director James Comey in the amount of time it takes to read a headline.

Everyone knows how Democrats were outraged at James Comey for allegedly causing Hillary Clinton to lose an election. The facts of course show that Hillary’s poll numbers were already on the way down before Comey announced he was reopening the investigation. So, even if he hadn’t made the announcement, it likely would have made no difference in the election’s outcome.

It just depended on what Comey was saying about issues that affected Democrats and Republicans. If he said something that might potentially hurt the Democrats, then the Democrats hated him, and wanted him to resign. If he said something that might potentially damage the Republicans, then the Republicans hated him, and wanted him to resign.

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It just so happened that during his most recent testimony before a Senate committee, Comey had earned the scorn of Democrats mainly for his explanation justifying why he had to make an announcement on October 28. Here was Hillary Clinton’s former campaign manager just hours before Comey got fired:

Podesta was referencing Comey’s comments during his testimony that the thought that his big announcement could have affected the outcome of the election left him ‘mildly nauseous.’

But it wasn’t too long before Podesta’s opinion of him changed rather dramatically:

Here, Podesta’s referencing the so-called Saturday Night Massacre. As the Daily Caller explained:

The reference to “massacre” on Saturday night dates back to Watergate, when President Richard Nixon wanted special prosecutor Archibald Cox fired by his Attorney General, Elliot Richardson. Richardson resigned in protest, as did Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus. Finally, Solicitor General Robert Bork complied with Nixon’s order and fired Cox.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


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Philip Hodges

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