University Psychologists Accuse Trump of Being ‘Paranoid, Delusional’

A group of psychology faculty and mental health professionals convened at Yale University Thursday to discuss the threat President Trump’s alleged mental illness poses to America.
The professors accused Trump of being “paranoid, delusional,” and having “grandiose thinking,” thereby violating the “Goldwater Rule” forbidding psychologists from psychoanalyzing people they have not personally evaluated.

A group of psychology faculty and mental health professionals convened at Yale University Thursday to discuss the threat President Trump’s alleged mental illness poses to America.

The group, dubbed “Duty to Warn” in reference to a psychologist’s immunity from legal repercussions when disclosing information about a client who exhibits violent behavior, claims that it has an “ethical responsibility” to inform the American public about Trump’s “dangerous mental illness.”

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“Worse than just being a liar or a narcissist, in addition he is paranoid, delusional, and [has] grandiose thinking and he proved that to the country the first day he was President,” remarked John Gartner, a former Johns Hopkins University professor who helped launched the group, according to The Independent. “If Donald Trump really believes he had the largest crowd size in history, that’s delusional.”

Thursday’s event was organized by Professor Bandy Lee, an instructor in Yale’s Department of Psychiatry, who told The Connecticut Post that “prominent psychiatrists have noted, [Trump’s mental health] is the elephant in the room,” adding that she thinks the public should “widely talk about this now.”

The Independent reports that one professor who spoke at the conference, James Gilligan of New York University, suggested that his history of working “with murderers and rapists” allows him to “recognize dangerousness from a mile away,” though he asserted that “you don’t have to be an expert on dangerousness or spend fifty years study it like I have in order to know how dangerous this man i…

Read the rest of the story at Campus Reform 

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Campus Reform

Campus Reform

Campus Reform, a project of the Leadership Institute, is America's leading site for college news.
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