Why Ecuador Cut Off Assange’s Internet

Holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy in Great Britain four four years, the founder of WikiLeaks Julian Assange had his internet access shut down by the government of Ecuador two weeks after Assange leaked the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign head John Podesta.

“We can confirm Ecuador cut off Assange’s internet access Saturday, 5 p.m. GMT, shortly after publication of (Hillary) Clinton’s Goldman Sachs speeches [sic],” the statement from WikiLeaks said.

“We have activated the appropriate contingency plans,” added the Twitter message on Monday. People close to WikiLeaks say that Assange himself is the principal operator of the website’s Twitter feed.

Trending: Young Autistic Boy Screams for Help as Bullies Nail Wooden Plank to His Head

The removal of Assange’s internet access did not stop the Podesta emails from going out. Monday’s was delayed, but Tuesday’s batch went out in the morning as usual. It was just sent by others in the WikiLeaks organization, and the Ecuadorian govt. has given assurances that Assange’s asylum hasn’t been damaged.

take our poll - story continues below

Do you support President Trump's plan to impose tariffs on Mexico?

  • Do you support President Trump's plan to impose tariffs on Mexico?

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Eagle Rising updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Sources close to both the Democratic Party and WikiLeaks say they believe WikiLeaks has acquired as many as…

Read the rest of the story at Jeff Dunetz’s blog The Lid

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Send this to a friend