FBI Director Comey: Those Critical of Clinton Investigation are “Full of Baloney”

According to FBI Director James Comey, there was nothing “political” intended by his decision to dump Hillary’s interview notes over Labor Day weekend. It just happened that way. In fact, it was his way of keeping things transparent.

In a memo to the Bureau’s employees, Comey stated that he considered waiting until after Labor Day weekend – perhaps around Tuesday – to release the notes and other documents, just so that people wouldn’t accuse him of being political. But in the end, it just happened to fall on a holiday weekend. “My judgment was that we had promised transparency and it would be game-playing to withhold it from the public just to avoid folks saying stuff about us,” Comey said. “We don’t play games.”

Of note, if you recall, the FBI interview in question also happened on a holiday weekend, just five days after Bill Clinton’s chance encounter with Attorney General Loretta Lynch. The over-4-hour interview itself was conducted at Hillary’s D.C. home on Saturday morning, July 4.

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Over the past few weeks, Director Comey has met with groups of former FBI agents who are quite critical of his handling of Hillary’s investigation. In his memo, Comey reiterated that the facts of the case just weren’t “prosecutable.” He wrote:

You may be sick of this, but let me leave you with a few words about how I have been describing the email investigation in private to our former employees as I meet them around the country. I explain to them that there are two aspects to this: (1) our judgment about the facts and prosecutive merit; and (2) how we decided to talk about that judgment.

I tell them that the difficult decision was actually the second part, not the first. At the end of the day, the case itself was not a cliff-hanger; despite all the chest-beating by people no longer in government, there really wasn’t a prosecutable case. The hard part was whether to offer unprecedented transparency about our thinking. I explain to our alumni that I struggled with that part, but decided the best way to protect the FBI, the Department of Justice, and the American people’s sense of justice was to announce it in the way we did – with extraordinary transparency and without any kind of coordination.

He went on to explain that he’s fine if people have a difference of opinion about how he approached the investigation, he “struggle[s] to see how they actually could, especially when they didn’t do the investigation.”

He concluded: “Those suggesting that we are “political” or part of some “fix” either don’t know us, or they are full of baloney (and maybe some of both).”

 

 

 

 

 

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Philip Hodges

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