Democrats Guide Pennsylvania to 2nd Highest Sales Tax in America!

If Pennsylvania’s latest proposed budget comes to fruition, the Keystone State could see a raise in sales tax for the first time in 50 years.

Rates would increase from 6 percent to 7.5 percent, according to the framework legislators laid out Tuesday night. Up to an additional 2 percent in local sales taxes could be tacked on to the rate, meaning certain areas could pay up to 9.25 percent — making it the second highest in the country.

A projected $2 billion would be generated in revenue, poised to be put toward property tax relief.

take our poll - story continues below

Will the Democrats try to impeach President Trump now that they control the House?

  • Will the Democrats try to impeach President Trump now that they control the House?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Eagle Rising updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Trending: Scientists Admit “Math Error” Led To Alarming Results In Major Global Warming Study

Critics of the tentative plan, which would increase taxes by $500 million, feel there are changes to state programs that could raise funds without putting the burden on the taxpayer.

“Before we ask Pennsylvanians to pay more for everyday purchases, the governor and lawmakers should ensure all other options have been explored,” Matthew Brouillette, president and CEO of the Commonwealth Foundation, said in a statement. “That means enacting real public pension reform that puts the state back on a fiscally-responsible track, generating revenue by privatizing the state liquor monopoly, and cutting off the corporate welfare gravy train by eliminating unfair business subsidies.”

State Lawmakers have been at a stalemate over the budget for the past five months. Wolf’s proposal was voted down last month due to Republicans’ opposition to increasing the state’s income tax by 16 percent.

“Simply ending unnecessary corporate welfare programs would save nearly $700 million annually. And it wouldn’t cost taxpayers a dime,” Brouillette said.

 

Source

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

eaglerising

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Send this to a friend