Elderly Vet Manhandled at Obama VFW Speech!

President Obama travelled to Pittsburgh on Tuesday to speak to several thousand veterans about the ongoing problems in the Department of Veterans Affairs and several other veteran-related issues.

In covering the event, the military news outlet Stars and Stripes notes that it’s not the kind of outlet where the President typically finds a lot of fans.

Perhaps reflecting mixed feelings about the president among veterans, Obama often drew tepid applause, especially for comments about his nuclear deal with Iran. 

While giving his speech, a lone, elderly veteran rose silently and held a sign attacking the Obama administration for their part in the Benghazi debacle (or scandal). Apparently three other veterans don’t believe that silent protest should be allowed at a speech, because they quite literally tackled the older man before ripping his sign away. Undeterred the man rose again, hands held in the air to protest what he obviously believes to be the grave injustices committed by the Obama administration.

Because he no longer had his sign he was forced to vocalize his displeasure and began yelling Benghazi while the President spoke. This disruption forced security to remove him physically from the building.

 

I’m not sure what country we’re supposed to be living in when a veteran can’t SILENTLY display his displeasure with our political leaders. The veterans who attacked him should be ashamed of themselves for accosting a man who was involved in a respectful (and silent) display of protest.

Here’s the local news coverage of the event in Pittsburgh.

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