North Korea, George Clooney and “the Interview”

George Clooney has finally gotten the courage to rage against Kim Jong-un’s hacking of Sony and against the film company’s deciding not to show an inane comedy, “The Interview.”  He is, actually, against his nature, standing up for America against North Korea.

Of course, he didn’t do this when he married Amal Alamuddin his anti-Israel wife.  He not only sides with our enemies, he marries them.

It is surprising that Clooney wants Sony to stand up to North Korea. He rarely stands up for our country.  He is a communist in a coat of many hundred dollar bills.   I suppose that is because this is the one time that it affects his living.  He doesn’t want dictators interfering with movies because he earns his fame and money from them.

When Clooney made “Good Night and Good Luck” he took cheap shots at Senator McCarthy and spooned out the usual pabulum that anti-communism was some kind of excessive sin.  He doesn’t like America very much.

Clooney just likes getting rich and famous from his mindless, clichéd movies. So why not back Sony to stand behind the movie.   As for his acting, Howdy Doody would be more expressive. He is a wooden thespian and a wooden-headed political thinker.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

David Lawrence

David Lawrence

David Lawrence has a Ph.D. in literature. He has published over 200 blogs, 600 poems, a memoir “The King of White-Collar Boxing,” several books of poems, including “Lane Changes.” Both can be purchased on Amazon.com. He was a professional boxer and a CEO. Last year he was listed in New York Magazine as the 41st reason to love New York.

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