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Technology

Twitter Users Sue Trump for Blocking Them

Written by Joe Scudder

These Twitter users think they have the right to tell Donald Trump how he can use social media.

Twitter users are suing Donald Trump for blocking them from commenting on his account. They have not sued Twitter for allowing Twitter users to block commenters that they find obnoxious. They are only suing Donald Trump for using Twitter the same as they can.

Perhaps Trump’s legal team should offer a deal to these complainers. He will no longer block someone if they also give up their right to block people on Twitter. Then, if they get interaction from thousands of deplorables, they can rethink their decision.

The New York Times reports, “Twitter Users Blocked by Trump File Lawsuit.

A group of Twitter users blocked by President Trump sued him and two top White House aides on Tuesday, arguing that his account amounts to a public forum that he, as a government official, cannot bar people from.

The blocked Twitter users, represented by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, raised cutting-edge issues about how the Constitution applies to the social media era. They say Mr. Trump cannot bar people from engaging with his account because they expressed opinions he did not like, such as mocking or criticizing him.

“The @realDonaldTrump account is a kind of digital town hall in which the president and his aides use the tweet function to communicate news and information to the public, and members of the public use the reply function to respond to the president and his aides and exchange views with one another,” the lawsuit said.

By blocking people from reading his tweets, or from viewing and replying to message chains based on them, Mr. Trump is violating their First Amendment rights because they expressed views he did not like, the lawsuit argued.

It offered several theories to back that notion. They included arguments that Mr. Trump was imposing an unconstitutional restriction on the plaintiffs’ ability to participate in a designated public forum, get access to statements the government had otherwise made available to the public and petition the government for “redress of grievances.”

Read the entire New York Times story.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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