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Economics

So It Begins: Illinois Bankruptcy Acknowledged by the Mainstream Media

Written by Joe Scudder

The fact that Illinois bankruptcy is practically inevitable finally gets reported on.

There are signs of Illinois bankruptcy everywhere. The gridlock in the state legislature may be a cause of it, but it is more significant as a symptom. The Democrat-dominated system has broken down because there is no money left. The usual compromises don’t work anymore because they cost too much.

Another sign is that both Powerball and Mega Millions are halting business in Illinois because the state can’t afford to pay off winners. They’re afraid continuing in Illinois will wreck their reputations.

CBS News reports, “Could Illinois be the first state to file for bankruptcy?

Illinois residents may feel some solidarity with the likes of Puerto Rico and Detroit.

A financial crunch is spiraling into a serious problem for Illinois lawmakers, prompting some observers to wonder if the state might make history by becoming the first to go bankrupt. At the moment, it’s impossible for a state to file for bankruptcy protection, which is only afforded to counties and municipalities like Detroit. 

Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection could be extended to states if Congress took up the issue, although Stanford Law School professor Michael McConnell noted in an article last year that he believed the precedents are iffy for extending the option to states. Nevertheless, Illinois is in a serious financial pickle, which is why radical options such as bankruptcy are being floated as potential solutions. 

Ratings agency Moody’s Investor Service earlier this month downgraded Illinois’ general obligation bonds to its lowest investment grade rating, citing the state’s growing pile of unpaid bills and its mounting pension deficit. Illinois, by the way, has the lowest credit rating of any state. Lower ratings mean higher borrowing costs, since lenders view such borrowers as riskier bets.

“Legislative gridlock has sidetracked efforts not only to address pension needs but also to achieve fiscal balance, allowing a backlog of bills to approach $15 billion, or about 40 percent of the state’s operating budget,” the agency noted. 

As noted by the Fiscal Times, Illinois is the only state that’s been operating without a balanced and complete budget for almost two years. 

“We’re like a banana republic. We can’t manage our money,” Gov. Bruce Rauner said…

Read the entire story.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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