2016 Election Homosexuality

Liberal Reporter Tries to Trip Up Conservative Presidential Candidate with a “Gotcha” Question – His Response is Brilliant!

gay-marriage
Written by Onan Coca

Conservative politicians have been forced to develop a thick skin when dealing with members of the mainstream media. In a political season like the one we’re in now, “gotcha” questions become commonplace, and it’s the conservative candidates who are forced to deal with them most often. As such, the wise conservative likely spends time preparing for these “gotcha” occasions in an effort to minimize any possible damage from these questions. However, it takes a special talent to be able to turn one of these questions into a positive development instead of something that could hurt their campaign…

Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) is just such a talent.

On Monday morning he made an important appearance on ABC’s Good Morning America to participate in a live town hall in New York City. At one point during the event Senator Cruz was asked about the conflict between religious liberty and the ability for gay men (and women) to marry.

Question: “I’ve noticed that a lot of religious freedom laws and a lot of legalized discrimination laws happening around the country. What would you do as president to protect me and my husband from that institutionalized discrimination?”

Cruz answers the question deftly, focusing on the facts and reminding the questioner that everyone shares the right to religious liberty.

It was on the heels of this voter question that liberal George Stephanopoulos tried to cause Cruz to stumble by pushing forward on the gay marriage issue. But Cruz didn’t falter and he pushed forward delivering yet another brilliant defense of our Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

“I am a constitutionalist and under the Constitution, marriage is a question for the states. That has been the case from the very beginning of this country- that it’s been up to the states. And so if someone wants to change the marriage laws, I don’t think it should be five unelected lawyers down in Washington dictating that. And even if you happen to agree with that particular decision, why would you want to hand over every important public policy issue to five unelected lawyers who aren’t accountable to you, who don’t work for you— instead if you want to change the marriage laws, convince your fellow citizens to change the laws. And by the way, it may end up that–we’ve got 50 states– that the laws in one state may be different than another state and we would expect that. We would expect the people of New York to adopt different laws than perhaps the people of Texas or California and that’s the great thing about a big, diverse country is that we can have different laws that respect different values.”

 

 

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Onan Coca

Onan is the Editor-in-Chief at Liberty Alliance media group. He's also the managing editor at Eaglerising.com, Constitution.com and the managing partner at iPatriot.com. You can read more of his writing at Eagle Rising.
Onan is a graduate of Liberty University (2003) and earned his M.Ed. at Western Governors University in 2012. Onan lives in Atlanta with his wife and their three wonderful children.

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