Culture Education

School Daze – University Course has Students INVENT New Kinds of Porn

No, culture isn’t in decline at all… why would you even think that? Could it be the bizarre and completely disgusting classes being offered in our top universities today? Like a class where students are instructed to invent a new kind of pornography and encouraged by their teacher to avoid other pornography so as not to taint their work.

What happened to the days when college was about learning content of a real academic nature?


 

A bizarre new course offered at Carnegie Mellon University is challenging students to “resist” the Internet by crafting viral content, hustling people for money and, of course, inventing a new genre of pornography.

The class, titled “Internet Resistance“ and first noticed at the Vice-spinoff Motherboard, is offered at the university’s art school by the predictably eccentric Paolo Pedercini. The site’s syllabus describes it as “both a schizo-seminar about critical issues in cyberculture and a trans-media studio course to develop terrible ideas for the networked society.”

sex-educationOne such critical issue in cyberculture, it seems, is Rule 34, the principle that if something exists, there is porn of it.

Students are told to “create an artifact that defines a new porn/fetish genre,” and will receive an A if it can be demonstrated that their pornography aroused somebody. They will receive a C if it turns out that their “created” genre already exists.

Mercifully, the syllabus clarifies that the assignment “can be approached conceptually if it makes you too uncomfortable.”

Strange pornography is only the tip of the iceberg of the course’s strange offerings. Students are also told to “find a creative way to make money on the Internet,” with their grade depending on how much money is made. Another assignment orders them to craft a viral meme, with As going to students who net at least 10,000 views and failing grades reserved for “viral catastrophes” such as bomb threats.

Pedercini told Motherboard that despite the odd syllabus, the course is entirely serious.

“We are at a point right now where the critique of techno-utopianism/Silicon Valley ideology is not just the prerogative of a few paranoid hackers and internet critical theorists,” he said. “[Artists] can work with the absurd, over-identify with the adversary, warn about troubling future trends. In a world of problem-solvers, artists have to play the role of problem-makers.”

Pedercini’s serious outlook even extends to the pornography assignment.

“The Rule 34 is relevant because it mirrors other internet-driven trends like the extreme fragmentation of fandoms and indie music, and evokes a crucial question for a creative producer: How can I come up with something new when everything has been done?”

 

Source

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Onan Coca

Onan is the Editor-in-Chief at Liberty Alliance media group. He's also the managing editor at Eaglerising.com, Constitution.com and the managing partner at iPatriot.com. You can read more of his writing at Eagle Rising.
Onan is a graduate of Liberty University (2003) and earned his M.Ed. at Western Governors University in 2012. Onan lives in Atlanta with his wife and their three wonderful children.

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