Politics

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s State of the State Address sounds an Awful Lot like a Presidential Campaign Speech!

Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) gave his “State of the State” address in Trenton on Tuesday night, and boy, it sure did remind me of a Presidential campaign speech. Don’t believe me? Read this bit from his remarks…

America’s leadership in the world is called into question because of a pattern of indecision and inconsistency.

During this time of uncertainty it seems our leaders in Washington would rather stoke division for their own political gain.

And this culture of divisiveness and distrust has seeped into our communities and our neighborhoods.

As I traveled the country over the last year, this anxiety was the most palpable emotion I saw and felt.

I saw it on the streets of Chicago and felt it in the suburbs of Maryland.

I heard it from farmers in Kansas and from teachers in Colorado.

I felt it from veterans in Maine and from workers in Arkansas.

But the wisest words came from an 82 year old woman in Florida.

She grabbed my hand and asked me a simple, but powerful question: “What’s happened to our country? We used to control events. Now events control us.”

But right here, in this great state, we have the tools to get back on track.

 

If Christie isn’t running for the White House… he definitely knows how to make it sound like he is.

Watch his whole speech here…

Christie’s speech starts at about 14:25 into the video and ends at about 58:00 into the video.

 

 

This is a partial transcript of his statements with the particularly Presidential bit near the end. For a full transcript please go to Save Jersey.com.

 

The state of our state continues to get better.

New Jersey is better off than it was last year at this time, and it is certainly far better off than it was just five years ago.

While many first years of a second term show a hangover from the campaign and its partisanship, we have fought through that tradition and have real accomplishments to show for that action in 2014.

In a year with plenty of politics from some overly partisan corners of this chamber, New Jersey has made progress — growing our economy, creating jobs, reforming our criminal justice system, and improving some of our most challenged cities — like Camden.

We’ve done it because a majority of us care more about our state and New Jersey’s middle class than we do about scoring partisan political points.

Since last January, the total number of people employed in New Jersey has grown by over 90,000, and the number of unemployed has dropped by nearly 30,000.

We recorded our 5th consecutive year of private sector job growth, and the unemployment rate continues to steadily go down.

We have attracted and retained companies — from Subaru USA to the Philadelphia 76ers to Sandoz.

We have grown our economy and more people are working, supporting their families and knowing the power of going to work every day in New Jersey today than one year ago.

We have done this while holding the line on government spending and government employment.

We also extended the successful cap on a key driver of property tax growth.

And we passed real criminal justice reform in New Jersey.

This bipartisan reform of the bail system keeps violent offenders off the streets and gives non-violent offenders who often sit in jail because they can’t afford bail a chance to reclaim their lives.

This is good for public safety.

This is good for families.

This is good for New Jersey.

chris-christieNow, despite this progress … Despite so much evidence of an improving New Jersey … It has become fashionable in some quarters to run down our state.

I get it: that’s politics.

But let’s be clear.

Our growth in this past year has been part of a trend.

A trend that began five years ago.

It is easy to forget where we were and how far we have come.

Five years ago, our unemployment rate was 9.7%.

Over 440,000 New Jerseyans were out of work.

Today, the unemployment rate is 6.4%.

We have cut unemployment by over one third in the last 5 years.

And we have created over 150,000 private sector jobs in New Jersey in five short years.

Five years ago, we faced massive consecutive budget deficits –$2 billion for fiscal year 2010 and a projected $11 billion the next year, on a budget of only $29 billion.

We fixed it by making hard choices; the way middle class families in New Jersey have to do it in their homes.

Today, we have balanced five budgets in a row.

And we will balance a sixth this year.

And we didn’t do it the Washington way, by raising taxes.

We did it by cutting spending, shrinking government, and fundamentally reforming the way government operates.

This administration believes today — and has always believed — that New Jersey and America, will be a better place for middle class families by shrinking the size of government.

Back then, state spending had grown by 56% in the years from 2001 to 2008.

Today discretionary spending in our state’s budget is $2.5 billion below its level in fiscal year 2008.

Back then, the size of government was out of control.

Today, the number of state government employees is 6,000 lower than it was five years ago.

Back then, New Jersey’s highest in the nation property taxes had increased more than 70% in ten years.

We averaged a 7% growth in property taxes per year.

Today, we have had four years of less than 2% annual property tax growth.

Now it’s because of the property tax cap we passed together in 2011 is working.

This is a bipartisan achievement.

We also came together this year to extend the reforms of interest arbitration awards.

This act has continued to make property tax control possible.

In these past five years, we have delivered needed tax relief to small businesses.

The $2.3 billion small business tax relief package that we continue to phase in is improving New Jersey’s business climate and making our state more competitive.

That approach is explicit in the sweeping, bipartisan changes we’ve made to New Jersey’s economic incentive programs.

I want to congratulate you: we have streamlined these incentives.

And we have better targeted them to areas of our state that need investment most.

And the verdict is in — and the early returns from the economic opportunity act show that it is working to attract and retain businesses.

In total, our pro-growth policies and streamlined economic development efforts have brought in over $12 billion dollars of new public and private investment in New Jersey in these last five years.

 

 

ChrisChristieAmerica’s leadership in the world is called into question because of a pattern of indecision and inconsistency.

During this time of uncertainty it seems our leaders in Washington would rather stoke division for their own political gain.

And this culture of divisiveness and distrust has seeped into our communities and our neighborhoods.

As I traveled the country over the last year, this anxiety was the most palpable emotion I saw and felt.

I saw it on the streets of Chicago and felt it in the suburbs of Maryland.

I heard it from farmers in Kansas and from teachers in Colorado.

I felt it from veterans in Maine and from workers in Arkansas.

But the wisest words came from an 82 year old woman in Florida.

She grabbed my hand and asked me a simple, but powerful question: “What’s happened to our country? We used to control events. Now events control us.”

But right here, in this great state, we have the tools to get back on track.

We know that, time and again, economic growth has delivered the most good for the most people.

And we know that the policies of lower taxes and less intrusive government have created higher economic growth and better paying jobs for our middle class.

We know that a commitment to education at every level is another key to a better tomorrow.

We just have to have the courage to fix those schools we know aren’t working and to empower principals, teachers, parents, and students to reach for the sky; and the wisdom to invest in the schools, colleges, and universities that can take us there.

We know that our ability to make these investments in education, infrastructure, our cities and our communities is dependent on our willingness to control the smothering costs of entitlements.

We know these things as a people, yet too often in the past our leaders have failed to act on them and the result is a sense of drift.

Let me be clear.

We need to address this anxiety head on.

We need to renew the spirit and the hopes of our state, our country and our people.

A renewal of our commitment to the hard-working families who are the backbone of our state.

A renewal of our commitment to the simple belief that our people deserve better than a bloated national government that imposes costs on our states which suffocate our people.

A renewal of our commitment to the ideal — and the hard work to make it happen –that New Jersey’s best days can lie ahead.

That we don’t have to accept anything less.

A renewal of our commitment to the belief that New Jersey and its people deserve better from us, those they have chosen to lead.

We need a New Jersey renewal and an American renewal.

 

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by EagleRising.com


About the author

Onan Coca

Onan is the Editor-in-Chief at Liberty Alliance media group. He's also the managing editor at Eaglerising.com, Constitution.com and the managing partner at iPatriot.com. You can read more of his writing at Eagle Rising.
Onan is a graduate of Liberty University (2003) and earned his M.Ed. at Western Governors University in 2012. Onan lives in Atlanta with his wife and their three wonderful children.

Don't Miss Out!!

Get your daily dose of Eagle Rising by entering your email address below.

STAY IN THE LOOP
Don't miss a thing. Sign up for our email newsletter to become an insider.

Send this to friend